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European Research Council (ERC) Awards

CReAM's Director, Christian Dustmann has been awarded an ERC Advanced grant on The Migration Challenge: Labour Markets, Policy Reforms, and Social Cohesion.

UCL News

ERC News

CReAM's Deputy Director, Uta Schönberg has been awarded an ERC Consolidator grant on Wage Inequality.

UCL News

ERC News

Cutting refugees’ benefits results in more crime and less education

Reducing welfare benefits for refugees and immigrants is largely ineffective for increasing employment and promoting integration, and instead leads to poverty, ‘survival crime’ and less schooling, according to a new study from CReAM's Christian Dustmann and co-authors from the Rockwool Foundation.

This research received very high media attention in Denmark and has resulted in a public hearing (26.03.2019) and a presentation in the Danish Parliament.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Research by Christian Dustmann and Thomas Cornelissen finds that boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap (60-80%) with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

The Times

The Indepedent

Tes

Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

CReAM public lecture

CReAM organised an Invited Lecture on "The Self Selection of Immigrants" at the 3rd EALE-SOLE World Conference. The speakers were George Borjas and Eric Gould.

Event date: Thursday 17th June 2010

On Thursday 17 June 2010, CReAM organised an Invited Lecture on "The Self Selection of Immigrants" at the 3rd EALE-SOLE World Conference.

 

George Borjas, Professor of Economics and Social Policy, Harvard University, gave a talk entitled Immigration and Self-Selection: Recent Research - Download Lecture Slides.

Professor Borjas’s research on the economic impact of immigration is widely perceived as playing a central role in the debate over immigration policy in the United States and abroad. He is the author of several books, including Wage Policy in the Federal Bureaucracy (American Enterprise Institute, 1980), Friends or Strangers: The Impact of Immigrants on the U.S. Economy (Basic Books, 1990), Labor Economics (McGraw-Hill, 1996; 2nd Edition, 2000, 3rd edition, 2005), and Heaven’s Door: Immigration Policy and the American Economy (Princeton University Press, 1999). He has published over 100 articles in books and scholarly journals, including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. His work also appears regularly in major magazines and newspapers, including articles in The Atlantic Monthly and National Review, as well as editorials in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Le Monde.

Eric Gould, Professor of Economics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem), held a talk entitled When Is "Too Much" Inequality Not Enough? The Selection of Israeli Emigrants (based on joint work with Omer Moav) - Download Paper.

Eric Gould joined the economics department at Hebrew University after receiving his  Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1996. He has published several papers in leading journals in the following areas: (1) the effect of immigrants on the economic and educational outcomes of natives and vice versa; (2) the causes and consequences of increasing wage inequality, (3) marriage market behavior, (4) the effect of the environment on the economic and social outcomes of individuals, and (5) the analysis of incentives and externalities in contracts. In 2004, he received the H. Gregg Lewis Prize for the best paper published in the Journal of Labor Economics from 2002-2003. Currently, he is also a research fellow of IZA and the CEPR, and an associate editor of Labour Economics.