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Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

The Criminal Behaviour of Young Fathers

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and  Rasmus Landersø, finds that  very young fathers who have their first child while they are still teenagers subsequently commit less crime if the child is a boy than if it is a girl. This  then has a spill over effect on other young men of a similar age living in the same neighbourhoods as the young father. The research was covered on the British press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

The Telegraph

The Times

 

BBC 2

"I was quite prepared... to use the cover of the statistician's analysis": Former home secretary David Blunkett and Prof Dustmann on the 2003 report on EU accession

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Brown Bag Seminar
Patricia Cortes (Boston University)

Gender Differences in Job Search and the Earnings Gap: Evidence from Business Majors

Event date: Tuesday 19th February 2019
12.30-1.30 pm Drayton, Room 321

A large experimental literature has documented robust gender differences in risk preferences and overconfidence. Since searching for a job is inherently a dynamic process that involves significant uncertainty, gender differences in preferences and beliefs are likely to lead to gender differences in job search behavior and starting salaries. In this paper, we empirically and theoretically examine the interaction between risk preferences, overconfidence, job search behavior, and its resulting impact on starting pay.
We begin by establishing some facts about gender differences in the job search process utilizing information on job offers and acceptances from a survey of business undergraduate alumni from Boston University. We document a clear gender difference in the timing of job offer acceptance – a simple hazard analysis reveals that females accept an offer at a rate that is 18% faster than for males. Interestingly, the gender earnings gap in accepted offers narrows in favor of women over the course of the job search period. To rationalize the empirical patterns, we develop a job search model that incorporates gender differences in risk aversion and in the degree of confidence about the offer distribution that individuals face. The model generates a decline in the gender gap in accepted offers over the course of the year – as men learn over time and become less overconfident, they begin to accept more low-wage offers, which works to lower the gender wage gap. The eventual goal is to estimate the model and conduct various counterfactuals.