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The Refugee Crisis

Professor Christian Dustmann comments on the current European debate on the refugee crisis and migration quotas on BBC World Service 

 

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

The Criminal Behaviour of Young Fathers

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and  Rasmus Landersø, finds that  very young fathers who have their first child while they are still teenagers subsequently commit less crime if the child is a boy than if it is a girl. This  then has a spill over effect on other young men of a similar age living in the same neighbourhoods as the young father. The research was covered on the British press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

The Telegraph

The Times

 

BBC 2

"I was quite prepared... to use the cover of the statistician's analysis": Former home secretary David Blunkett and Prof Dustmann on the 2003 report on EU accession

 

British Academy

Professor Christian Dustmann has been elected Fellow of the British Academy in recognition for his academic career and public engagement.

 

Handelsblatt

Professor Christian Dustmann ranked within the top 3 German speaking economists on the 2017 Handelsblatt ranking.

 

Brexit

BBC News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing recent trends in foreign-born worker flows in and out of the UK on the BBC News at One.

 

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Brown Bag Seminar
Elie Murand (IZA - Institute of Labor Economics)

'Mass Refugee Inflow and Long-Run Prosperity: Lessons from the Greek Population Resettlement' (joint with Seyhun Orcan Sakalli)

Event date: Tuesday 2nd October 2018
12.30-1.30 pm Drayton, Room 321

This paper investigates the long-term consequences of mass refugee inflow on economic development by examining the effect of the first large-scale population resettlement in modern history. After the Greco-Turkish war of 1919–1922, 1.2 million Christian-Orthodox were forcibly resettled from Turkey to Greece, increasing the Greek population by more than 20% within a few months. We build a novel geocoded dataset locating settlements of refugees across the universe of more than four thousand Greek municipalities that existed in Greece in 1920. Exploiting the spatial variation in the resettlement location, we find that localities with a greater share of refugees in 1923 have today higher earnings, higher levels of household wealth, greater educational attainment, as well as larger financial and manufacturing sectors. These results hold when comparing spatially contiguous municipalities with identical geographical features and are not driven by pre-settlement differences in initial level of development across localities. The long-run beneficial effects appear to arise from agglomeration economies generated by the large increase in the workforce, occupational specialization, as well as by new industrial know-hows brought by refugees, which fostered early industrialization and economic growth