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Cutting refugees’ benefits results in more crime and less education

Reducing welfare benefits for refugees and immigrants is largely ineffective for increasing employment and promoting integration, and instead leads to poverty, ‘survival crime’ and less schooling, according to a new study from CReAM's Christian Dustmann and co-authors from the Rockwool Foundation.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Research by Christian Dustmann and Thomas Cornelissen finds that boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap (60-80%) with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

The Times

The Indepedent

Tes

Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Shing-Yi Wang (Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania )

The Labor Market Consequences of Having a Boy

Event date: Monday 25th February 2019
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Christopher Ingold G21 Ramsay LT Speaker Room: 208

Combining eight years of panel data with an event study approach, we show that rural Chinese womens' labor supply falls for one year following the birth of a daughter before returning to their pre-birth levels. The negative impact of the birth of a son on women's labor supply is much larger in magnitude and persists for four years. We also find that households reduce their consumption of cigarettes more following the arrival of a boy than a girl. Furthermore, there is an increase the probability of being in school and time spent on leisure for mothers following the birth of boys but not daughters. Together, these results are consistent with two mechanisms. First, mothers are rewarded for giving birth to boys, leading them to consume more leisure and work less. Second, households' returns to investment are higher for boys than girls, leading mothers to invest more effort in them.