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The Refugee Crisis

Professor Christian Dustmann comments on the current European debate on the refugee crisis and migration quotas on BBC World Service 

 

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

The Criminal Behaviour of Young Fathers

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and  Rasmus Landersø, finds that  very young fathers who have their first child while they are still teenagers subsequently commit less crime if the child is a boy than if it is a girl. This  then has a spill over effect on other young men of a similar age living in the same neighbourhoods as the young father. The research was covered on the British press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

The Telegraph

The Times

 

BBC 2

"I was quite prepared... to use the cover of the statistician's analysis": Former home secretary David Blunkett and Prof Dustmann on the 2003 report on EU accession

 

British Academy

Professor Christian Dustmann has been elected Fellow of the British Academy in recognition for his academic career and public engagement.

 

Handelsblatt

Professor Christian Dustmann ranked within the top 3 German speaking economists on the 2017 Handelsblatt ranking.

 

Brexit

BBC News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing recent trends in foreign-born worker flows in and out of the UK on the BBC News at One.

 

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Kaivan Munshi (University of Cambridge)

'Community Networks and the Evolution of Private Enterprise in China' (joint with Ruochen Dai, Dilip Mookherjee, and Xiaobo Zhang)

Event date: Monday 15th October 2018
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Ricardo LT Speaker Room: 113

This paper identifies and quantifies the role played by birth-county-based community networks in the growth of private enterprise in China. We develop a network-based model that generates predictions for the dynamics of firm entry, concentration, and firm size across birth counties with varying social connectedness (measured by population density). These predictions are verified over the 1990-2009 period with administrative data covering the universe of registered firms. Competing non-network-based explanations can explain some, but not all, of the results. Moreover, supplementary evidence indicates that network spillovers occur within the birth county and, going down even further, within clans within the county. Having validated the model, we estimate its structural parameters and conduct counter-factual simulations, which estimate that entry over the 1995-2004 period would have been 40% lower (with a comparable decline in the stock of capital) in the absence of community networks. Additional counter-factual simulations shed light on misallocation and industrial policy in economies where networks are active.