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Cutting refugees’ benefits results in more crime and less education

Reducing welfare benefits for refugees and immigrants is largely ineffective for increasing employment and promoting integration, and instead leads to poverty, ‘survival crime’ and less schooling, according to a new study from CReAM's Christian Dustmann and co-authors from the Rockwool Foundation.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Research by Christian Dustmann and Thomas Cornelissen finds that boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap (60-80%) with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

The Times

The Indepedent

Tes

Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Adeline Delavande (University of Essex)

'Estimating the production function of Graduate skills at university' 

Event date: Monday 16th October 2017
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Ricardo LT, Drayton House Speaker Room: 304

Using a new longitudinal study of UK undergraduate students, we estimate the production function of graduate skills at university, which we proxy with marks. We use a flexible functional form and a large set of inputs. The inputs considered include both students’ investment (time spent attending lectures and classes, study time spent using active learning techniques, study time spent using passive learning techniques) and students’ characteristics (past educational attainment, cognitive skills and non-cognitive skills). We deal with the endogeneity of the student’s investments by allowing unobserved heterogeneity in outcome and investment to be correlated and by exploiting random class assignment. We find that attendance to lectures and classes and study time are important inputs in the production function of graduate skills. However, time spent using active learning techniques is much more productive than time spent on passive learning techniques. Interestingly, we find that cognitive skills are important determinant of students’ investment, but have no direct impact in the production function. The reverse is true for cognitive skills.