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"I was quite prepared... to use the cover of the statistician's analysis": Former home secretary David Blunkett and Prof Dustmann on the 2003 report on EU accession


BBC World Service - My Perfect Country

Christian Dustmann discusses the achievements and shortcomings of Germany’s refugee integration policy on the BBC World Service Programme My Perfect Country: Germany.


British Academy

Professor Christian Dustmann has been elected Fellow of the British Academy in recognition for his academic career and public engagement.



Professor Christian Dustmann ranked within the top 3 German speaking economists on the 2017 Handelsblatt ranking.


CEPR Report

Professor Dustmann and Dr Otten are coauthors in the first report in CEPR's Monitoring International Integration series, Europe's Trust Deficit: Causes and Remedies. They analyse the roots of the decline in trust in both national and European political institutions, as reflected in the rise of populist politics. 

Press Release

VoxEU article summarising the report

Audio interview with Christian Dustmann & Barry Eichengreen



BBC News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing recent trends in foreign-born worker flows in and out of the UK on the BBC News at One.


BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann on BBC Three Counties discussing the likely effects of Brexit on the UK's farming industry.


The Conversation

Ian Preston on a podcast from The Conversation, on the referendum on Britain's EU membership (8th June 2016)


Freedom of Movement

BBC World News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the ongoing migration crisis and the migration challenges the G20 Summit would need to address, on BBC World News (7th July 2017).


Sky News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the UK Population Figures on Sky News (22nd June 2017).


BBC News - Talking Business

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the future of freedom of movement on the BBC News Talking Business panel (1st October 2016).


CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
David McKenzie (The World Bank)

'Testing Classic Theories of Migration in the Lab'

Event date: Monday 23rd April 2018
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Ricardo LT, Drayton House Speaker Room: 108

We use incentivized laboratory experiments to investigate how potential migrants make decisions between working in different destinations in order to test the predictions of different classic theories of migration. We test theories of income maximization, migrant skill-selection, and multi-destination choice and how the predictions and behavior under these theories vary as we vary migration costs, liquidity constraints, risk, social benefits, and incomplete information. We show how the basic income maximization model of migration with selection on observed and unobserved skills leads to a much higher migration rate and more negative skill-selection than is obtained when migration decisions take place under more realistic assumptions. Second, we find evidence of a home bias, where simply labelling a destination as “home” causes more people to choose that location. Thirdly, we investigate whether the independence of irrelevant alternatives (IIA) assumption holds. We find it holds for most people when decisions just involve wages, costs, and liquidity constraints. However, once we add a risk of unemployment and incomplete information, IIA no longer holds for about 20 percent of our sample.