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News

BBC 2

"I was quite prepared... to use the cover of the statistician's analysis": Former home secretary David Blunkett and Prof Dustmann on the 2003 report on EU accession

 

British Academy

Professor Christian Dustmann has been elected Fellow of the British Academy in recognition for his academic career and public engagement.

 

Handelsblatt

Professor Christian Dustmann ranked within the top 3 German speaking economists on the 2017 Handelsblatt ranking.

 

CEPR Report

Professor Dustmann and Dr Otten are coauthors in the first report in CEPR's Monitoring International Integration series, Europe's Trust Deficit: Causes and Remedies. They analyse the roots of the decline in trust in both national and European political institutions, as reflected in the rise of populist politics. 

Press Release

VoxEU article summarising the report

Audio interview with Christian Dustmann & Barry Eichengreen

 

Brexit

BBC News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing recent trends in foreign-born worker flows in and out of the UK on the BBC News at One.

 

The Conversation

Ian Preston on a podcast from The Conversation, on the referendum on Britain's EU membership (8th June 2016)

 

Freedom of Movement

BBC World News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the ongoing migration crisis and the migration challenges the G20 Summit would need to address, on BBC World News (7th July 2017).

 

Sky News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the UK Population Figures on Sky News (22nd June 2017).

 

BBC News - Talking Business

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the future of freedom of movement on the BBC News Talking Business panel (1st October 2016).

 

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Hans-Joachim Voth (University of Zurich) 

'Rage Against the Machines'

Event date: Monday 12th March 2018
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Jevons LT, Drayton House Speaker Room: 309

Can the adoption of labor-saving technology lead to social instability and unrest? We examine a canonical historical case, the so-called 'Captain Swing' riots in 1830s Britain. Variously attributed to the adverse consequences of weather shocks, the shortcomings of the Poor Law, or the after-effects of enclosure, we emphasize the importance of a new technology - the threshing machine. Invented in the 1780s, it spread during and after the Napoleonic Wars. Using farm advertisements from newspapers published in 66 English and Welsh towns, we compile a new measure of the technology's diffusion. Parishes with ads for threshing machines had much higher riot probabilities in 1830 - and the relationship was even stronger for machine-breaking attacks. Threshing machines were mainly useful in wheat-growing areas. To establish a causal role for labor-saving technology, we instrument technology adoption the FAO measure of soil suitability for wheat, and with suitability for water mills, and show that this in turn predicts unrest. The link from technology adoption to unrest was weaker where poor law provision was more generous, and where displaced workers could easily access urban labor markets. Finally, we document that technology adoption and patenting rates declined after 1832 in areas with more unrest.