twitter logo

News

The Criminal Behaviour of Young Fathers

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and  Rasmus Landersø, finds that  very young fathers who have their first child while they are still teenagers subsequently commit less crime if the child is a boy than if it is a girl. This  then has a spill over effect on other young men of a similar age living in the same neighbourhoods as the young father. The research was covered on the British press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

The Telegraph

The Times

 

BBC 2

"I was quite prepared... to use the cover of the statistician's analysis": Former home secretary David Blunkett and Prof Dustmann on the 2003 report on EU accession

 

BBC World Service - My Perfect Country

Christian Dustmann discusses the achievements and shortcomings of Germany’s refugee integration policy on the BBC World Service Programme My Perfect Country: Germany.

 

British Academy

Professor Christian Dustmann has been elected Fellow of the British Academy in recognition for his academic career and public engagement.

 

Handelsblatt

Professor Christian Dustmann ranked within the top 3 German speaking economists on the 2017 Handelsblatt ranking.

 

CEPR Report

Professor Dustmann and Dr Otten are coauthors in the first report in CEPR's Monitoring International Integration series, Europe's Trust Deficit: Causes and Remedies. They analyse the roots of the decline in trust in both national and European political institutions, as reflected in the rise of populist politics. 

Press Release

VoxEU article summarising the report

Audio interview with Christian Dustmann & Barry Eichengreen

 

Brexit

BBC News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing recent trends in foreign-born worker flows in and out of the UK on the BBC News at One.

 

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann on BBC Three Counties discussing the likely effects of Brexit on the UK's farming industry.

 

Freedom of Movement

BBC World News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the ongoing migration crisis and the migration challenges the G20 Summit would need to address, on BBC World News (7th July 2017).

 

Sky News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the UK Population Figures on Sky News (22nd June 2017).

 

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Katrine Loken (NHH) 

Incarceration, Recidivism and Employment (joint with Manudeep Bhuller, Gordon Dahl and Magne Mogstad)

Event date: Monday 19th February 2018
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Jevons LT, Drayton House Speaker Room: 113

Understanding whether, and in what situations, time spent in prison is criminogenic or preventive has proven challenging due to data availability and correlated unobservables. This paper overcomes these challenges in the context of Norway’s criminal justice system, offering new insights into how incarceration affects subsequent crime and employment. We construct a panel dataset containing the criminal behavior and labor market outcomes of the entire population, and exploit the random assignment of criminal cases to judges who differ systematically in their stringency in sentencing defendants to prison. Using judge stringency as an instrumental variable, we find that imprisonment discourages further criminal behavior, and that the reduction extends beyond incapacitation. Incarceration decreases the probability an individual will reoffend within 5 years by 27 percentage points, and reduces the number of offenses over this same period by 10 criminal charges. In comparison, OLS shows positive associations between ncarceration and subsequent criminal behavior. This sharp contrast suggests the high rates of recidivism among exconvicts is due to selection, and not a consequence of the experience of being in prison. Exploring factors that may explain the preventive effect of incarceration, we find the decline in crime is driven by individuals who were not working prior to incarceration. Among these individuals, imprisonment increases participation in programs directed at improving employability and reducing recidivism, and ultimately, raises employment and earnings while discouraging further criminal behavior. Contrary to the widely embraced 'nothing works' doctrine, these findings demonstrate that time spent in prison with a focus on rehabilitation can indeed be preventive.