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European Research Council (ERC) Awards

CReAM's Director, Christian Dustmann has been awarded an ERC Advanced grant on The Migration Challenge: Labour Markets, Policy Reforms, and Social Cohesion.

UCL News

ERC News

CReAM's Deputy Director, Uta Schönberg has been awarded an ERC Consolidator grant on Wage Inequality.

UCL News

ERC News

Cutting refugees’ benefits results in more crime and less education

Reducing welfare benefits for refugees and immigrants is largely ineffective for increasing employment and promoting integration, and instead leads to poverty, ‘survival crime’ and less schooling, according to a new study from CReAM's Christian Dustmann and co-authors from the Rockwool Foundation.

This research received very high media attention in Denmark and has resulted in a public hearing (26.03.2019) and a presentation in the Danish Parliament.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Research by Christian Dustmann and Thomas Cornelissen finds that boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap (60-80%) with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

The Times

The Indepedent

Tes

Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Hannes Schwandt (University of Zurich)

'The Lasting Legacy of Seasonal Influenza: In-Utero Exposure and Labor Market Outcomes'

Event date: Monday 6th November 2017
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Ricardo LT, Drayton House Speaker Room: 113

Pregnancy conditions have been shown to matter for later economic success, but many threats to fetal development that have been identified are difficult to prevent. In this paper I study seasonal influenza, a common and preventable illness that comes around every year and causes strong inflammatory responses in pregnant women. Using administrative data from Denmark, I identify the effects of maternal influenza on the exposed offspring via sibling comparison, exploiting both society-wide influenza spread and information on individual mothers who suffer strong infections during pregnancy. In the short term, maternal influenza leads to a doubling of prematurity and low birth weight, by triggering premature labor among women infected in the third trimester. Following exposed offspring into young adulthood, I observe a 9% earnings reduction and a 35% increase in welfare dependence. These long-term effects are strongest for influenza infections during the second trimester and they are partly explained by a decline educational attainment, pointing to cognitive impairment. This effect pattern suggests that maternal influenza damages the fetus through multiple mechanisms, and much of the damage may not be visible at birth. Taken together, these results provide evidence that strong infections during pregnancy are an often overlooked prenatal threat with long-term consequences.