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The Criminal Behaviour of Young Fathers

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and  Rasmus Landersø, finds that  very young fathers who have their first child while they are still teenagers subsequently commit less crime if the child is a boy than if it is a girl. This  then has a spill over effect on other young men of a similar age living in the same neighbourhoods as the young father. The research was covered on the British press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

The Telegraph

The Times

 

BBC 2

"I was quite prepared... to use the cover of the statistician's analysis": Former home secretary David Blunkett and Prof Dustmann on the 2003 report on EU accession

 

BBC World Service - My Perfect Country

Christian Dustmann discusses the achievements and shortcomings of Germany’s refugee integration policy on the BBC World Service Programme My Perfect Country: Germany.

 

British Academy

Professor Christian Dustmann has been elected Fellow of the British Academy in recognition for his academic career and public engagement.

 

Handelsblatt

Professor Christian Dustmann ranked within the top 3 German speaking economists on the 2017 Handelsblatt ranking.

 

CEPR Report

Professor Dustmann and Dr Otten are coauthors in the first report in CEPR's Monitoring International Integration series, Europe's Trust Deficit: Causes and Remedies. They analyse the roots of the decline in trust in both national and European political institutions, as reflected in the rise of populist politics. 

Press Release

VoxEU article summarising the report

Audio interview with Christian Dustmann & Barry Eichengreen

 

Brexit

BBC News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing recent trends in foreign-born worker flows in and out of the UK on the BBC News at One.

 

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann on BBC Three Counties discussing the likely effects of Brexit on the UK's farming industry.

 

Freedom of Movement

BBC World News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the ongoing migration crisis and the migration challenges the G20 Summit would need to address, on BBC World News (7th July 2017).

 

Sky News

Professor Christian Dustmann discussing the UK Population Figures on Sky News (22nd June 2017).

 

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Petra Moser (NYU) 

'Effects of Copyrights on Science: Evidence from the WWII Book Republication Program'

Event date: Monday 2nd October 2017
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Ricardo LT, Drayton House Speaker Room: 113

Copyrights for books, news, and other types of media are a critical mechanism to encourage creativity and innovation. Yet economic analyses continue to be rare, partly due to a lack of experimental variation in modern copyright laws. This paper exploits a change in copyright laws as a result of World War II to examine the effects of copyrights on science. In 1943, the US Book Republication Program (BRP) granted US publishers temporary licenses to republish the exact content of German-owned science books. Using new data on citations, we find that this program triggered an 80 percent increase in citations to German-owned science books. This increase was driven by a significant reduction in access costs: Each 10 percent decline in the price of BRP book was associated with a 45 percent increase in citations. To investigate the mechanism by which lower book prices influence science, we collect data on library holdings across the United States. We find that lower prices helped to distribute BRP books across US libraries, including poorer institution. Analyses of the locations of citing authors further indicate that citations increased most for locations that gained access to BRP books. Results are confirmed by two alternative measures of scientific output: new PhDs in mathematics and US patents that use knowledge in BRP books.