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European Research Council (ERC) Awards

CReAM's Director, Christian Dustmann has been awarded an ERC Advanced grant on The Migration Challenge: Labour Markets, Policy Reforms, and Social Cohesion.

UCL News

ERC News

CReAM's Deputy Director, Uta Schönberg has been awarded an ERC Consolidator grant on Wage Inequality.

UCL News

ERC News

Cutting refugees’ benefits results in more crime and less education

Reducing welfare benefits for refugees and immigrants is largely ineffective for increasing employment and promoting integration, and instead leads to poverty, ‘survival crime’ and less schooling, according to a new study from CReAM's Christian Dustmann and co-authors from the Rockwool Foundation.

This research received very high media attention in Denmark and has resulted in a public hearing (26.03.2019) and a presentation in the Danish Parliament.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Research by Christian Dustmann and Thomas Cornelissen finds that boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap (60-80%) with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

The Times

The Indepedent

Tes

Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Petra Moser (NYU) 

'Effects of Copyrights on Science: Evidence from the WWII Book Republication Program'

Event date: Monday 2nd October 2017
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Ricardo LT, Drayton House Speaker Room: 113

Copyrights for books, news, and other types of media are a critical mechanism to encourage creativity and innovation. Yet economic analyses continue to be rare, partly due to a lack of experimental variation in modern copyright laws. This paper exploits a change in copyright laws as a result of World War II to examine the effects of copyrights on science. In 1943, the US Book Republication Program (BRP) granted US publishers temporary licenses to republish the exact content of German-owned science books. Using new data on citations, we find that this program triggered an 80 percent increase in citations to German-owned science books. This increase was driven by a significant reduction in access costs: Each 10 percent decline in the price of BRP book was associated with a 45 percent increase in citations. To investigate the mechanism by which lower book prices influence science, we collect data on library holdings across the United States. We find that lower prices helped to distribute BRP books across US libraries, including poorer institution. Analyses of the locations of citing authors further indicate that citations increased most for locations that gained access to BRP books. Results are confirmed by two alternative measures of scientific output: new PhDs in mathematics and US patents that use knowledge in BRP books.