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European Research Council (ERC) Awards

CReAM's Director, Christian Dustmann has been awarded an ERC Advanced grant on The Migration Challenge: Labour Markets, Policy Reforms, and Social Cohesion.

UCL News

ERC News

CReAM's Deputy Director, Uta Schönberg has been awarded an ERC Consolidator grant on Wage Inequality.

UCL News

ERC News

Cutting refugees’ benefits results in more crime and less education

Reducing welfare benefits for refugees and immigrants is largely ineffective for increasing employment and promoting integration, and instead leads to poverty, ‘survival crime’ and less schooling, according to a new study from CReAM's Christian Dustmann and co-authors from the Rockwool Foundation.

This research received very high media attention in Denmark and has resulted in a public hearing (26.03.2019) and a presentation in the Danish Parliament.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Research by Christian Dustmann and Thomas Cornelissen finds that boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap (60-80%) with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

The Times

The Indepedent

Tes

Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

CReAM conference

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Ben Enke (Harvard) 

'Kinship Systems, Cooperation and the Evolution of Culture'

Event date: Monday 11th December 2017
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Ricardo LT, Drayton House Speaker Room: 204

An influential body of psychological and anthropological theories holds that societies exhibit heterogeneous social cooperation systems that differ both in their level of in-group favoritism and in the tools that they employ to enforce cooperative behavior. According to these theories, entire bundles of functional psychological adaptations — religious beliefs, moral values, social preferences, emotions, and social norms — have evolved to serve as ``psychological police officer'' in different cooperation regimes. This paper develops a measure of the tightness of historical kinship structures to test these theories across historical ethnicities, contemporary countries, ethnicities within countries, and among migrants. The results document that societies with loose ancestral kinship ties cooperate and trust broadly, which appears to be enforced through universal moral values, internalized guilt, altruistic punishment, and large-scale institutions. Societies with a historically tightly knit kinship structure, on the other hand, cheat on and distrust out-group members but readily support in-group members in need. This cooperation regime is enforced by communal moral values, emotions of external shame, revenge-taking, conformity to social norms, and local institutions. Belief in a moralizing god was historically predominantly associated with loose kinship but is more prevalent among descendants of tight kinship societies today, consistent with theories of belief in a moralizing deity becoming functionally redundant once cooperative norms have been internalized.